Danny Kaye Double Feature, Bing Crosby and Edie Adams Now On DVD

Here’s what classic titles are available this week!

Danny Kaye: The Goldwyn Years    

Danny Kaye made his feature film debut in “Up In Arms” (1944), as a hypochondriac Army draftee who starts feeling even worse when his girlfriend (Constance Dowling) stows aboard his Pacific-bound freighter. Lively service farce marked by “Theater Lobby Number,” “Melody in 4-F” co-stars Dana Andrews, Dinah Shore. When a slick entertainer (Kaye) who saw a mob hit gets rubbed out by a gang boss (Steve Cochran), the showman’s earthbound spirit decides to see justice done–by possessing the body of his nebbish librarian twin brother (Kaye, again). “Wonder Man” (1945) co-stars Virginia Mayo, Vera-Ellen. After a meek milkman (Kaye) fortuitously KOs the middleweight champ (Cochran), a calculating promoter (Walter Abel) starts building him up as the next big thing. “The Kid From Brooklyn” (1946), a do-over of “The Milky Way,” co-stars Mayo, Vera-Ellen. A mild-mannered music professor (Kaye) gets in hot water when he gets a gun moll (Mayo) to help compile a “jazz encyclopedia” in “A Song Is Born” (1948). Howard Hawks’ musical remake of his own “Ball of Fire” co-stars Benny Goodman, Louis Armstrong

Danny Kaye Double Feature    

When a usurper (Cecil Parker) drives the infant heir to the British throne into exile, rebels contrive to have the child’s timid caregiver (Danny Kaye) replace “The Court Jester” (1955) who’s been newly hired for the traitor’s amusement. Laugh-filled costume farce features the famous “pellet with the poison in the vessel with the pestle” bit. Basil Rathbone, Glynis Johns, Angela Lansbury co-star. Then, Kaye stars as jazz great Red Nichols in the biopic “The Five Pennies” (1959), chronicling the domestic problems and musical triumphs of the ’20s cornet wizard. Barbara Bel Geddes, Tuesday Weld, Louis Armstrong, Bob Crosby co-star. Tunes include “Good Night, Sleep Tight,” “The Music Goes Round and Round.”

The Bells Of St. Mary’s  (Remastered Edition) (1945)

Bing Crosby reprises his “Going My Way” role of dedicated priest Father O’Malley, who faces the biggest challenge of his life when he is assigned to shore up a financially troubled parochial school. Thrust into a battle of wills with strong-willed nun Sister Mary Benedict (Ingrid Bergman), the two must learn to cooperate in order to save the beleaguered institution. Oscar-winning favorite co-stars Henry Travers, William Gargan.

Here’s Edie: The Edie Adams Television Collection

Sultry singer/actress Edie Adams was hostess of her own 1962-64 ABC variety program, “Here’s Edie” (later “The Edie Adams Show”), which featured lavish musical performances and comedy sketches.  All 21 episodes of the series–with Edie welcoming such guest stars as Count Basie, Sammy Davis, Jr., Zsa Zsa Gabor, Bob Hope, Rowan and Martin, and many others–are featured, along with clips of Edie performing on husband Ernie Kovacs’ shows, in a four-disc set. 

Oliver! (Limited Edition)    BLU-RAY    (1968)

Consider yourself right in when you watch this lively musical adaptation of the Dickens classic that garnered six Oscars, including Best Picture. Mark Lester stars as the plucky orphan lad, Jack Wild is his pal, the Artful Dodger, and Ron Moody is the rapscallious Fagin. Delightful score from composer Lionel Bart includes “Food, Glorious Food,” “Where Is Love?” and more. With Oliver Reed, Hugh Griffith and Shani Wallis. 

Jane Eyre (Limited Edition)    BLU-RAY   (1944)                             

This darkly romantic filming of Charlotte Bronte’s classic Victorian novel stars Joan Fontaine as a spinsterish governess who takes a position on a remote estate in the Yorkshire    moors and falls in love with the manor’s brooding master (Orson Welles). Features an unforgettable Bernard Herrmann score and eerie   photography. With Margaret O’Brien and Peggy Ann Garner; look for an uncredited Elizabeth Taylor.

Nosferatu (Two-Disc Deluxe Remastered Edition)    BLU-RAY   (1922)

F.W. Murnau’s unauthorized adaptation of “Dracula” is a masterpiece of silent German horror. The mysterious Count Orlock heads for London, coffin in tow, to spread his undead terror. As the vampire, star Max Schreck’s bizarre, bat-eared, clawed makeup is unforgettable.  With Gustav von Wangenheim, Greta Schroeder.

The Wife Of Monte Cristo   (1946)

Prisoner-turned-nobleman Edmund Dantes returns to post-Revolution Paris to defend the poor and must contend with a corrupt prefect of police. When he’s injured, Dantes’ wife dons a mask and poses as her hubby in a series of thrilling adventures. Martin Kosleck, Lenore Aubert, John Loder, and Eva Gabor star in director Edgar G.  Ulmer’s offbeat swashbuckler.

Cheyenne: The Complete Seventh Season    (1962)                             

All 13 episodes from the seventh and final season are collected in a four-disc set.

The Way We Were (Limited Edition)    BLU-RAY   (1973)

One of the finest screen romances ever teams Robert Redford and Barbra Streisand as two philosophically different types whose love affair stretches from their ’30s college days to marriage and the turmoil of ’50s Hollywood. Despite their differences, the pair lived through the tumultuous times with passion and understanding. Lois Chiles, Patrick O’Neal, Viveca Lindfors co-star; Oscar-winning score by Marvin Hamlisch

See a complete list of all our DVD and Blu-ray releases. 

  • LaurenAva

    So glad they keep releasing Cheyenne!! Clint Walker’s the best.

  • Movie Fan

    I love the movie “Oliver!” I saw it on a class trip when I was a freshman in high school. “Who Will Buy (This Wonderful Morning)” and “Where Is Love” are my favorite songs from the movie.

  • Lorraine M.

    What would it take to get a DVD release of Kaye’s “The Man From the Diner’s Club”?

  • LINDA R

    I ALSO HAVE BEEN LOOKING FOR THE RELEASE OF “THE MAN FROM THE DINER’S CLUB STARRING DANNY KAYE. SEEMS LIKE IT IS THE ONLY ONE OF HIS MOVIES THAT HAS NOT BEEN ON DVD, OR ON VHS FOR THAT MATTER. PLEASE LET US KNOW IF THIS IS EVER GOING TO BE RELEASED.

    • williamsommerwerck

      It was one of Kaye’s last films and (if I recall correctly) was popular with neither the critics nor the public. By 1963, Kaye’s manic silliness playing a goof had worn thin.

      It’s interesting that the script was co-written by William Peter Blatty.

      • Bruce Reber

        TMFTDC WAS DK’s last movie before he moved to TV, where he hosted his own weekly variety series, “The Danny Kaye Show”, which ran on CBS from 1963-66.

  • al.hooper@comcast.net

    Finally! “Up In Arms” remains by far the best movie showcase for Danny Kay’s inimitable talents. It was unavailable for years because of a few non-PC scenes directed at Japan, our enemy of the time. Get over it already! The film’s production numbers have never been matched before or since. An all-round rousing experience.
    – Al Hooper (E-HOOPER.COM)

  • Bruce Reber

    Good to see that “The Five Pennies” is finally on DVD. So far the only DK movie I have on DVD is “Knock On Wood” (1953), one of his funniest.