Blazing Saddles: Ten Things To Know About The Movie

Here are 10 trivia facts about Blazing Saddles from 1974, which originally appeared as our Mystery Movie Quiz on our Facebook page. There are lots of pieces of behind-the-scenes information about this movie. Please feel free to comment and add more trivia we might have missed.

1. This film has racial overtones.

In 1974, before the letters PC meant “politically correct,” Mel Brooks‘ Blazing Saddles towered as a laugh-out-loud comedy containing many references to racism and some rather derogatory terms for African-Americans. Much like the then-popular TV series All in the Family, though, the words were to mock bigotry, and throughout the film it’s the prejudiced white townspeople and the villains who bear the brunt of all the jokes.

Cleavon Little is smooth and polished in his role of Bart, but the Broadway actor was not Brooks’ first choice as the sheriff. Richard Pryor was slated to star, but as it is quite often difficult to secure financing for movies in Hollywood, Pryor’s stand-up routines and background proved too controversial for studio brass, and the role was given to Little. Pryor did not lose out, however, as he was already on board as part of the five-man script-writing team.

2. The movie is set before the turn of the 20th century.

Brooks and his crew played fast and loose with historical accuracy in the film, as evidenced in an early scene where Governor LePetomane (Brooks) addresses henchman Hedley Lamarr (Harvey Korman) as “Hedy,” the start of a running gag where people confuse his name with that of the 1930s and ’40s screen sex symbol. When Korman takes umbrage at the reference, Brooks says to him “What the hell are you worried about? This is 1874. You’ll be able to sue her!” Of course, Brook’s “Old West” meets today’s “West” by the picture’s end.

3. The movie appears on many “best of” lists for its genre.

In addition to making “best of” lists from Premiere Magazine (among the “The 50 Greatest Comedies of All Time”) and voted #9 on Bravo TV’s list of the “100 Funniest Movies,” The American Film Institute voted Blazing Saddles into its AFI’s “100 Years…100 Laughs,” as #6. According to AFI’s description, these are the “the films and film artists that have made audiences laugh throughout the 20thcentury.” With a total of three Mel Brooks movies honored on that list, The Producers (1968) was #11 and Young Frankenstein (1974) was voted #13. Way to go, Mel!

4. Three of the actors appeared together in other movies.

Gene Wilder, Madeline Kahn and Dom DeLuise appeared in writer/driector Wilder’s  mystery spoof  The Adventure of Sherlock Holmes’ Smarter Brother in 1975. Two years later, Kahn and Harvey Korman joined Mel Brooks in High Anxiety (1977), and in 1979, Brooks, Kahn and co-writer Richard Pryor all had cameos in The Muppet Movie. And DeLuise was Emperor Nero in Brooks’  History of the World, Part 1 (1981), also starring Mel, Kahn and Korman. There are many movies where two of the stars appeared together (Young Frankenstein, among others) but if anyone knows of further Blazing Saddles talent “triple plays,” please let us know.

5. The film received three Oscar nominations.

Although Blazing Saddles is not an Oscar winner, and critics back in 1974 didn’t seriously believe it had any chance of being a contender, it was actually honored with three nominations: Best Actress in a Supporting Role for Madeline Kahn; Best Film Editing for John C. Howard and Danford B. Greene; and Best Music, Original Song for John Morris’ (music) and Mel Brooks’ (lyrics) title tune, sung in the film’s opening credits  by Frankie Laine.

The story goes that Brooks advertised for a “Frankie Laine-type” singer to perform his theme song, and unbelievably, Laine himself showed up. At this point, Brooks felt if he told the famous singer the movie was a comedy, either he wouldn’t have done it or he wouldn’t have taken the recording session seriously — so Brooks never told him until the film wrapped.

6. A foreign language is spoken briefly in the film.

As Bart (Little) relates his life story to the Waco Kid (Wilder), a wagon train seen heading west is set upon by Indians who proceed to massacre the entire party…save for a lone, segregated Conestoga wagon with the young Bart and his parents. When the Indian chief sees the family close-up, he says in Yiddish, “Blacks!,” “Don’t be crazy!” and “Let them go!,” then in English, “They darker than us!” As a sidebar, the young boy in the wagon was Rodney Allen Rippy, who was very active in 1970s TV and continues to be a working actor.

Brooks usually includes Jewish references in his films and, keeping in character, he designed the movie poster to show the Indian chief’s headdress embedded with Hebrew letters saying “Kosher For Passover.” But there’s no holding Brooks down and he intentionally misspelled the words on the headdress to say “Posher For Kassover.” Another Yiddish reference is the name of Madeline Kahn’s character, Lili Von Shtupp. In Yiddish, the word “shtupp” actually translates to “fill” or “stuff,” but the vulgar connotation it has attained generally relates to “sexual activity,” which it surely means in this movie. Kahn’s Oscar-nominated performance is definitely a parody of Marlene Dietrich’s Frenchie in the 1939 James Stewart western Destry Rides Again. It’s twue, it’s twue!

7. An iconic Hollywood director is satirized in the movie.

When Blazing Saddles reaches its surreal final moments, we see a Hollywood director, dressed in an outfit Michael Curtiz might have worn, filming an all-male chorus line in a showy musical number. Funnyman Dom DeLuise, playing the part of Buddy Bizarre, is lampooning a legendary choreographer and director of the ’30s and ’40s, Busby Berkeley.

8. A former NFL star appears in the movie.

The Mongo character was supposedly created by Richard Pryor, and Alex Karras plays the slow-witted man-mountain to the hilt. With the anticipation that trouble is in the air when Mongo rides into town, one of the local Mexicans flees in fear, saying, “Mongo! Santa Maria!” Mongo Santamaría was actually a famous Cuban percussionist notable for his 1963 hit, “Watermelon Man.”

Mongo’s scene where he knocks a horse out with a hefty right cross is a classic and seemed like a genuinely original gag until years later, when Sid Caesar in his biography claimed that once, when his terrible temper consumed him, he punched out a horse in Central Park. Brooks was apparently paying homage to his former Your Show of Shows boss.

9. The film’s director appears in the movie.

Mel Brooks plays three parts in the film. The director is first seen as the hysterical Governor William J. LePetomane. then as the Yiddish-spouting Indian chief, and then waiting on line in the villian hiring scene (in an aviator’s uniform and false teeth).

10. A bodily function is lampooned in one of the scenes.

Never before in a movie had audiences heard the sounds of “breaking wind.” Brooks looked at the typical cowboy diet he always saw in movies — black coffee and canned beans — and concluded that there must have been an awful lot of gas passing out on the range. And Mel, being Mel, made an art of the fart, using the sounds of flatulence for a full minute. In bad taste, yes, but pretty darn funny! According to an interview with Brooks, those sounds weren’t actually the real thing, but were created by soaping up one hand and squeezing it under the armpit… whatever!

On a similar note, the name of Governor LePetomane came from Le Pétomane,  a late 19th-century French music hall “artiste” whose stage routine consisted of him “inhaling” air into a certain part of his body and then expelling it in a variety of sound effects and imitations. He could also blow out a candle from several yards away and, aided by a rubber tube, play music on an ocarina.

More trivia:

Before Brooks decided to helm the film himself, it was thought that Alan Arkin would be the director and that Bart would be played by James Earl Jones. As time went on, things changed and Brooks wanted Dan Dailey as the Waco Kid, but Dailey’s health was failing and it didn’t work out. It was rumored that Johnny Carson was asked to play the “Waco” role but didn’t want it.

When production finally got under way, Gig Young was hired to be “Waco.” But on the very first day of shooting, Young turned out to be actually drunk in the scene where the ex-gunman is supposed to be hung over and dangling from the jail cell’s upper bunk. When Young literally passed out, Brooks realized that the actor’s known alcoholism was detrimental to the film and let him go. Brooks called his good friend Gene Wilder and asked him to fly out from New York to help find a replacement, but instead Gene became the Waco Kid. Years later it was revealed that Young sued Warner Brothers for not fulfilling their contract. It seems it should have been the other way around, but that story might be more folklore than truth.

Now that the film has become a classic, can we imagine anyone else in these roles other than the movie’s fine cast?

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  • Allen Hefner

    Blazing Saddles is definitely a favorite. The only problem I have with it is the ending. Everyone escaping the sound stage building just didn’t fit with the rest of the film. I think a better ending would have kept it in 1874, while continuing inside references to things in the next century. I’d like to give it a laurel and hearty handshake.

  • BadGnx2

    This is a COMEDY CLASSIC!!!
    This movie was way, way, ahead of its time. I remember when this film was first released, it was advertised with the caption on its poster and print ads – “From the company that brought you “The Jazz Singer”. Considering that this film was brought out during the height of the black film movement in Hollywood and African American life in general was in constant vogue/upheavel, that “Jazz Singer” reference was pretty ballsy and outrageous in its own right; especially when you consider that the lead character in “Jazz Singer” wore blackface.

    I didn’t know that Richard Pryor was considered for a lead role in this film. Its a shame that he didn’t get the chance to shine in this film cause he was a much better comic actor than Cleavon Little. And this film was Little’s only major film role. He also starred in a short lived TV show called “Temperatures Rising” with James Whitmore.
    Richard Pryor and Gene Wilder would later become good friends in addition to a good film comedy team with hits including “Silver Streak”. Theirs was a natural pairing that jelled well together.

    But “Blazing Saddles” was the granddaddy of the “studio outrageous Hollywood comedy film” that went on to spawn films like “Animal House”, “CaddyShack”, “Revenge Of The Nerds”, and give a career to stars like Will Ferrell, Adam Sandler, Eddie Murphy and many others.
    There were other underground outrageous comedy films that were made independently such as “The Groove Tube”, “Kentucky Fried Movie” and “Cry Uncle”. But “Blazing Saddles” was a big budget production, done on a grand scale with seemingly no expense spared. And the end result is the classic that it is today.

  • Ernst Steinert

    The Indians speaking yiddish, and the campfire scene, broke me up so much people in the theater started looking at me.

    • hypatiab7

      The Indians speaking Yiddish could have been a satire on the Mormon belief that the Amerinds were descended from the Lost Tribes of Israel. Mel Brooks is a very well read man and could very well have been aware of this.

  • Richard

    There is a reference to “Treasure of The Sierra Madre” when 2 guys on line say “we don’t need no stinkin’ badges”.

  • Bill

    An error was made when it was said that Mel Brooks played 3 different parts in the movie. It was actually 4 parts. They forgot to mention his role as the bar tender. Also, I really got a kick out of the part when the black workers were asked to sing a good old n….. work song and what they sang was a Cole Porter song of “I Get A Kick Out Of You” that was of course written well into the next century. All in all, this movie was one of the best, if not the best, comedies ever done.

  • Eddie Quillen

    (Spoiler warning)

    The crazy ending, which I loved, always struck me as a bit of of an homage to the comedy of Olsen and Johnson. Part of Brooks’ greatness, to me, and something that permeates most of his films, is his love and respect for all kinds of old movies, even while making fun of them. As Moviefanfare wrote, a year ago, O&J would break the fourth wall and also have scenes where they run amuck in the studio. The zaniness of Blazing Saddles, when they literally break the wall during the fight scene and end up brawling on the soundstage of another movie, before running amuck on the studio lot, culminating in the big showdown at (then) Graumann’s Chinese, IMHO, took the zaniness to a next level which would have made Ole and Chic proud.

    Anyway, Blazing Saddles is definitely, along with the original version of The Producers, a solid member of my “10 comedies I want with me if stuck for years on a desert island” list.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1675676852 Jerry Hightower

    One of my favorite movies. Mel brooks is a genius.

  • Dan Olson

    You can add “What’s Up Doc?” (1972), to the list of “Blazing Saddles” talent triple plays.

    1) Madeline Kahn
    2) John Hillerman
    3) Liam Dunn

  • Loyd Auerbach

    I went to see Blazing Saddles a couple of days after it premiered, on my 18th birthday. It’s one of my favorite memories: watching the movie in a completely packed house, folks laughing throughout but everyone laughing so hard at the campfire scene that people were crying and gasping for air (myself and my date included).

  • Bruce Thornton

    One of the best movies ever. Having a bad day, just pop this movie in and you will be rolling on the floor.

    • Sathish

      I love you.Let’s get mearird.We can have babies – I have a uterus.(Now all your readers are going to thing a troll left this, aren’t they?)

  • Grace

    I LOVE Blazing Saddles, but it’s second on my Mel Brooks’ list; Young Frankenstein is first!

    • Aman

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  • Mary-Lou Mayfield

    Maybe “Politically Correct” hadn’t been coined, but it was definitely in the air – the movie was billed as “something to offend everyone!”

  • Vickie H.

    I’ve watched it about a dozen times, and it’s still funny. Slim Pickins is hysterical (and so is the fellow who played Lyle).

  • Jack Kenna Sr

    Great movie. When shown on T-V They take out the words that may offend. This ruins it. You have to see and hear it as written.

  • Gord Jackson

    I’ll have to watch it again because most of its charm truly escapes me. And unlike most, I’m sorry but I didn’t find the campfire scene funny at all. I did, however, love the Dom DeLouise take on Busby Berkley at the end. Still, the only Brooks film I actually like is the rarely screened (and maybe little known) “The Twelve Chairs.”

    • Be Positive

      Campfire scene, maybe not. haha But the rest, epic. Leave good stuff here. Not your grievances. Why are people like that?? hmmmmm Peace

  • Nicki

    Brooks also appears briefly in the finale of “I’m Tired” I have all the Mel brooks films on DVD including “2000 Year Old Man” but “Blazing Saddles” is always at the front of the shelf. Brooks has even talked about making it his next Broadway hit.
    Wonder if Mongo will have his own song & dance number?!

  • Bill Rafalski

    “What in the Wide,Wide World of Sports is a-going on here.” One of my favorite films. My wife and I have seen the movie so many times, we can recite the dialogue.
    “Blazing Saddles” is rude, crude and totally hilarious. This movie changed the way I looked at Westerns.

  • Lorraine

    This movie debuted when I was 15 and I remember well the collective groan that went up at the cry of “Mongo! Santa Maria!” A wonderful moment among many, though if “Blazing Saddles” was re-released today I don’t think the audience would get the reference to the great Cuban artist or the song.

    Harvey Korman, taking a break from his stellar
    character work on “The Carol Burnett Show” was an absolute scream in this movie! I loved his sarcasm, and especially the wall-breaking moment when, alone in his office, “Hedley” mused “…But where would I get such a man?” and then, looking straight out at the audience continued: “And why am I asking you?”

    Madeline Kahn was genius as Lili/Marlene (and isn’t that a song? And a Fassbinder movie..?)

    And though I’d be the first to acknowledge Richard Pryor as one of the Comedy Gods of the Age, I remain forever grateful that the role of Sheriff Bart went instead to the elegant Cleavon Little. I can’t help thinking Pryor would have brought the wrong kind of energy to the role somehow. He could do many things, but not suave.

    This truly was a movie with something to offend everyone, in the best and the worst ways. And about that…

    Though it cracked up almost everyone around me, the campfire scene didn’t strike me as particularly funny. Still doesn’t. There. I’ve said it and I’m glad.

    And Burton Gilliam, the actor who played the grinning lout, Lyle (love that name), reportedly felt extremely uncomfortable about having to repeatedly use the N word. I’d love to know what Mel told him to make him feel a little less chary about that.

    And finally, though I’ve loved Dom DeLuise forever, I have to say this: I could never get comfortable with his Curtiz/Berkeley character’s flagrant homophobia, which over the years has seemed to me an extension of Brook’s over-willingness to mock, not all the gay haters out there (as he mocks the racists in the film), but gays themselves, particularly gay men. I know DeLuise was gay, and have heard rumors from time to time about Brooks, so that might explain a few things. Maybe.

    I still love the movie. Just not the over-the-top nastiness of that “Watch me, faggots!” moment which, predictably, got a big laugh. At 15 that moment was a slap in the face. All these years later, it still stings.

  • Andrew

    Still love that line when Lili asks Bart, “Would
    you like another Scnitzengruben?”.

  • JOUDON FORD

    Referencing BadGnx2′s comment of 3/5, Cleavon Little took over for Frankie Faison in a short-lived early 80s (?) sitcom about a black dentist married to a (natural) blond. I think Frankie’s features, quite African, proved a problem, despite his acting ability.

    I first saw Blazing Saddles in New Haven while at grad school. Being a black from New York, late of Brooklyn Tech, I knew a little Yiddish. I knew I was no longer in “Kansas” when I noticed I was the only one laughing at “certain” jokes. Losim geyin!

  • David Berkin

    My ten things to know about blazing saddles are
    1)It sucks
    2)It’s not funny
    3)It sucks
    4)It’s not funny
    5)It sucks
    6)It’s not funny
    7)It sucks
    8)It’s not funny
    9)It sucks
    10)It’s not funny

    • http://www.facebook.com/maryann.westerlund Maryann Westerlund

      you evidently have no sense of humor. Or just no sense.
      Mel Brooks is the King of Comedy

    • Livin Out Loud

      Seeing your kind of humor, you’re not funny, so you’re opinion doesn’t count! haha And maybe some kind of “happy” pill is in order? Good luck.. Learn Yiddish, kid Happy Chanukah… haha

    • Only happy thoughts

      Stay in school, D. B..

  • Babs

    Some people here just don’t have a sense of humour!!!! That’s Sad…………

  • Jack

    “Allright. We’ll give some land to the N****** and the Jews, but we don’t want the Irish”

  • bogart10

    FUNNY MOVIE….MADE WHEN EVEN BLACKS COULD LAUGH AT THEMSELVES….NOW WE CAN’T SAY ANYTHING POLITICALLY INCORRECT OR JESSEE JACKSON, ETC POP UP RAISING HELL….COMMON GUYS, LIGHTEN UP……

  • Joan Petrella

    I’m looking for the sheet music for ‘I’m Tired” from Blazing Saddles

  • Michelle Malkin

    I have a feeling that Mel Brooks knows a lot of American history. The Yiddish speaking Indians were probably a reference to the Mormons who believed that the American Indians were the Lost Tribes of Israel. Dumb conclusion but funny as hell in the movie. Also no one seems to notice that the Indian warpaint is red,white and blue which shows that they are very American Indians. Brooks is a genius. You can watch his movies over and over and still find references that you missed before.

  • JIM RICK

    YOU HAVE TO SEE THE “UNCUT” VERSION, NOT THE BUTCHERED PRINT SHOWN ON REGULAR TV….THAT SCENE AROUND A CAMPFIRE IS HALARIOUS…….

  • beldujour

    One of Mel Brooks’ best films and one of my favorite films of all time. I saw it when it was first released and wound up seeing it at least ten times more that year. I still fall apart laughing at some of the lines! (BTW, the expression “PC” was definitely around and in use back in those days, as was its opposite, “PI” — they simply were not applied universally to all aspects of life.)

  • Joe Glaeser

    Can’t recall who said it earlier but whenever I’m not feeling well I’ll watch this film and almost as the intro and song is being sung I start to feel better. Thanks Mel!!

  • Julius

    Madeline’s “I’m tired” is priceless. The removing of the campfire scene from commercial TV showings for “family values” reasons is downright silly, show me a kid that hasn’t giggled over a fart joke.
    “De Camptown Ladies” is a favorite… And let’s not forget Slim Pickens, a great comedy talent!

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    • Amandafigueiredoteixeira

      Joe, I think I’m much more in your doiictren than I am in the other. That said, if I was Bill Clinton and had bypass surgery and still wasn’t doing well, I’d be giving it a try. Better somewhat deprived than dead. The question is can you go mostly veggie and get most of the same health benefits and I think the answer to that is yes and the earlier you convert over the healthier you’re going to be as you age.

  • David R

    Other triple plays include Dom Deluise, George Furth and Hal Needham in The Cannonball Run”, Mel Brooks, Anne Bancroft and Harvey Korman in “Dracula Dead and Loving It”, Dom Deluise, Hal Needham and David Huddleston in “Smokey and the Bandit 2″. Two four plays include Gene Wilder, Dom DeLuise, David Huddleston and Carol Arthur in “The World’s Greatest Lover” and Mel Brooks, Gene Wilder, Madeline Kahn and Liam Dunn in “Young Frankenstein”. And the big one is five play with “History of the World, Part I” which includes Mel, Dom, Harvey K, Madeline K and John Hillerman…

  • ALICE

    I AM A REAL FAN I OWNE BOTH MOVIES AND I THINK BLAZING SADDLES IS BY FAR THE BEST ONE I AM AN AMERICAN AND I THINK IT IS FUNNY

  • Docs9

    There are so many classic comedies throughout film history, but this is my favorite. Young Frankenstein and Caddyshack rate right up there too, but Blazing Saddles is a notch above. I can still watch it and laugh after so many viewings, and I’ve worked in theaters most of my life so I’ve seen it MANY times!

  • Tom Herbert

    Young Frankenstein and Blazing Saddles are both hilarious movies, as are many of Mel Brooks films. He almost created his own genre. Pwease pwease, don’t forget Robin Hood, Men In Tights, for downright hilarity, specially if you watch Errol Flynn’s Robin Hood and then watch this version.

  • SONNY LACHNER

    ONCE AGAIN A FEW COMMENTS FROM ME…” BLAZING SADDLES” WAS SOMETHING SPECIAL TO ME AS DOM DELUISE WHO PLAYED BUDDY THE MOVIE DIRECTOR AS WELL AS DOM’S REAL LIFE WIFE WHO PLAYED THE SCHOOL MARM IN THE PICTURE HARRIET JOHNSON….ARE VERY DEAR FRIENDS OF MINE…..I WAS DEEPLY SADDENED BY DOM’S PASSING IN MAY 2009….BUT, I KEEP IN TOUCH WITH CAROL….AS WE WENT TO SCHOOL TOGETHER BACK IN OUR NATIVE STATE OF NEW JERSEY….I NEVER MET DOM IN PERSON, BUT DID GET TO TALK TO HIM ON THE PHONE….AND CAROL AND I KEEP IN TOUCH BY MAIL…DOM WOULD DROP ME A FEW LINES ON OCCASIONS AND I ALWAYS ANSWERED HIM…HE WAS A GIFTED ACTOR AND COMEDIAN….AND WAS A HECK OF A GOURMET CHEF….I MISS HIM VERY MUCH…CAROL WAS ALWAYS IN TO ACTING AND WAS A SPECIAL TALENT HER SELF…..AS I ALWAYS SAID YOU WON’T SEE THE LIKES OF THESE GREAT STARS ANY MORE, BUT THEIR GREAT PICTURES AND THEIR TALENTS CAN ALWAYS BE SEEN ON DVD ETC….-30-

  • Valerie

    What have I missed? I was out getting a “shit load of dimes”…

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  • Flukeza

    A very good movie, but I’m not sure I’d call it great. It’s amuotiibs as hell, which is much more than 99% of the movies out there can say, but it has its flaws. For instance, I think it could lose an hour off the running time and have even greater impact.But each time I see it I still cry my eyes out. And some of the trailers are brilliantly edited.

    • Blazing Saddles Rocks

      shhh An hour? bahaha Only positive….Depends what you’re looking for. All of us are different. One of my fave flix of all times, and I won Best Sense of Humor in School! haha Maybe need to know Yiddish and Mel’s crazy Jewish humor. Zei Gezunt Peace : )

  • crisnick

    Blazing Saddles is the first DVD I ever bought.  I do wish they had put on a special feature that showed the deleted scenes that were later added to make up time for TV, like when Little and Wilder are dressed in KKK garb running from the bad guys and they end up hiding with a bunch of born-again Christians in white robes performing baptisms.  There were also a couple more scenes with Little foiling Alex Karras’ character, but you can’t see them anymore.

  • Frank1168

    Where would you start? Bart riding his horse with Count Basie and his orchestra playing “April in Paris?” when Lyle asked that the n…… sings an old fashion song “Da Camptown Ladies” and the look on the faces of the gandy dancers, when Mr. Tagget rides up and yells “Ya like a bunch of Kansas City faggots.” I did read that Ms. Kahn stated that Mel wanted to treat me like a niece, until he saw her legs resting on her dressing table. Harvey Korman was brilliant, as was the governor’s secretary, who, incidentally, made porn films after this movie and was not heard from again. Or when Sheriff Bart, newly arrrived in town, told the city’s citizens “Excuse me, while I whip this out.” It is a shame both Bart and Lilli have both passed away, but they will forever be remembered, at least by me.

  • John Adent

    What were the Dr. Gallespie killings

  • Ron Jeremy

    “They said you was hung” “and they was right”. Great movie!! You couldn’t even consider making this movie today.

    • Wayne P.

      Gives new meaning to that Fred MacMurray western “Good Day for a Hanging” Now, if you could just get away with putting the word ‘well’ in front of ‘hung’ in your comment above…nah, that wouldnt be well, and good, would it? ;)

  • Amelia Sue

    One of the funniest movies of all time. Thanks to the content producers of this site for solving the mystery of what Brooks, as the Indian chief, said to the black family on the Conestoga wagon — and what the Hebrew letters said on the band of his war bonnet.

  • Cyleroy

    OMG – this film’s dialogue would have the PC police gasping for breath! TOO funny!

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  • Cari harris

    One of my top 3 all time favorite movies! Hysterical!!!!!!

  • Joe

    My mind is a raging torrent, flooded with rivulets of thought cascading into a waterfall of creative alternatives…