“A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood,” “Jojo Rabbit” and More New Releases!

 

Hi neighbor! It’s a beautiful day for…all of this week’s DVD and Blu-ray new releases. From recent Oscar winners to feel good favorites and beyond, you’re going to love reading through this list of titles that are now available!

A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood (2019)

Tom Hanks delivers a wonderful performance as Fred Rogers in this affecting biopic. Reluctantly assigned to pen a piece on the iconic children’s television host for Esquire magazine, journalist Lloyd Vogel (Matthew Rhys) has his pessimistic views unexpectedly altered when he strikes up a friendship with Mr. Rogers himself, who teaches him some valuable lessons about life. Chris Cooper, Susan Kelechi Watson, Enrico Colantoni, Maryann Plunkett co-star.

Jojo Rabbit (2019)

In Nazi Germany, gentle 10-year-old Johannes “Jojo” Betzler (Roman Griffin Davis) had enough problems with the contemptuous kids and staff at his Hitler Youth camp before he learned that his mother (Scarlett Johansson) was sheltering a Jewish teenager (Thomasin McKenzie). At least he had his imaginary friend to fall back on–an idealized, chummy version of Adolf Hitler (Taika Waititi). Writer-director Waititi’s audacious dark farce also stars Sam Rockwell, Rebel Wilson, Stephen Merchant, Alfie Allen.

Midway (2019)

Following the attack on Pearl Harbor, Navy intelligence officer Lt. Cmdr. Edwin Layton (Patrick Wilson) correctly predicted an upcoming assault on Midway Atoll. On June 4th, 1942, a U.S. fleet under the command of Admiral Chester Nimitz (Woody Harrelson) faced off against Japanese forces in what would become one of the most significant battles of World War II. Ed Skrein, Luke Evans, Mandy Moore, and Dennis Quaid also star in director Roland Emmerich’s stunning historical drama.

The Light at the Edge of the World (1971)

American ex-miner Will Denton (Kirk Douglas) and murderous buccaneer Captain Jonathan Kongre (Yul Brynner) battle to the death for control of an island lighthouse in this exciting adventure saga based on the novel by Jules Verne. When Kongre and his crew seize the lighthouse in order to force boats onto the rocks, Denton must fight to stop his sinister plan. Caught up in the fray is beautiful shipwrecked noblewoman Arabella (Samantha Eggar). With Jean-Claude Drouot, Fernando Rey.

The Point (Ultimate Edition)(1971)

Delightful animated fable about a land where all things and people have points, except for young Oblio (voiced by “The Brady Bunch’s” Mike Lookinland). Because of his “pointlessness,” he and his dog Arrow are banished to the Pointless Forest, but once there Oblio learns that things need not be pointed to have a “point.” Narrated by Ringo Starr; the Harry Nilsson score includes “Me and My Arrow,” “Poli High.”

The Man Who Was Sherlock Holmes (1937)

The game is afoot when two unemployed sleuths dress themselves up as Arthur Conan Doyle’s legendary detective and Dr. Watson in order to gain some publicity. When the pair stumbles upon an actual mystery to solve, can they muster the smarts and courage to make finding a collection of stolen priceless stamps seem elementary? Comic German suspenser stars Hans Albers, Heinz Rühmann.

Disturbing the Peace (2020)

A decade after his tenure with the Texas Rangers came to a violent and controversial end, local marshal Jim Dillon (Guy Pearce) refused to carry a gun as he kept order in his sleepy Lone Star town. When a sociopathic biker (Devon Sawa) and his gang roll into town and terrorize the populace, the lawman turns to cunning to try and take them out one by one…but the overwhelming odds might have to force his hand. Gripping actioner co-stars Michael Sirow, Michael Bellisario, Barbie “Kelly Kelly” Blank.

A Feeling of Home (2019)

Online impresario Abby (Joanna Walsh) was on the verge of a big marketing deal from her web channel about the New England lifestyle. Thing is, this faux Yankee is actually a Texan–and when her dad (Robby Benson) got hurt, she made a beeline back to the ranch. She arrived to find his old hand (and her old flame) Ryan (Nathan Parsons) helping out…and she soon found herself questioning to which world she belonged. Hallmark Channel romance co-stars Shannon Chan-Kent, Matt Mazur.

Rasputin – The Mad Monk (1966)

Christopher Lee’s most monstrous film portrayal may have been of a real person, Grigori Rasputin, in this Hammer Films look at the charismatically menacing Russian holy man who used hypnosis to gain power in the court of Czar Nicholas II, where he seduced women and mercilessly crushed any potential rivals. Barbara Shelley, Richard Pasco, Francis Matthews co-star.

Munchhaüsen (1943)

Made under the auspices of Nazi Minister of Propaganda Joseph Goebbels to mark the 25th anniversary of Germany’s UFA studio, this lavish, effects-filled fantasy stars Hans Albers as the baron whose notorious tall tales included encounters with Catherine the Great and Casanova, a ride on a cannonball, and a trip into space. With Hermann Speelmans, Brigitte Horney. AKA: “The Adventures of Baron Munchhaüsen,” “Baron Munchhaüsen.”

Gerry (2002)

Director Gus Van Sant’s stripped-down character study stars Matt Damon and Casey Affleck as two friends, both named Gerry, who find themselves lost in a bleak and unforgiving desert. As they wander aimlessly across the harsh landscape, their already complex relationship undergoes a series of momentous changes, taking them on an emotional journey as challenging as their physical excursion.

The Douglas MacLean Collection

Personable Philadelphian Douglas MacLean was a popular light comic lead of the ‘20s, and his talent shines in two rescued films from his largely lost output. Looking to save his small-town drugstore family from a chain, Jimmy Knight (MacLean) looks to compete by concocting and peddling a phony patent medicine, in “One a Minute” (1921). With Marian De Beck. Cut out of his uncle’s brokerage for his romantic pursuit of an actress, Harry Elrod (MacLean) looks to make good lugging luggage as “Bell Boy 13” (1923). With John Steppling, Margaret Loomis.

Click here for a complete rundown of all of this week’s new releases.

  • John

    …and after you view the cited Munchhaüsen view Karel Zeman’s take on the tall tales, “Baron Prasil”. Of course give credit to Terry Gilliam where credit’s due, but of the three versions I get the Czech.